“Expo Plus – Advanced Textiles Conference” attendees are free to move between the four tracks (Medical, Military, Smart Fabrics, Testing) as well as Specialty Fabrics sessions plus attend the Advanced Textiles Networking Reception. Learn more about Advanced Textiles at IFAI Expo here. Download the Advanced Textiles Attendee Brochure here.

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The following is subject to change. Disclaimer at bottom of page.

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Tuesday, September 26

8 AM
8–8:30 am

Presented by: Connie Huffa, President, Fabdesigns

Smart fabrics and wearable tech are words that are interchanged frequently. They are distinctly different but intersect at a special point in design and engineering where making the technology invisible by shrinking it and embedding into the fabric, garment or product itself is the holy grail of the next generation in products. The next generation is blurring the lines between electronics, polymer science, traditional apparel and fabrics in our everyday lives. Consumers do not need another gadget rather want their technology to be intuitive and fit into their existing lifestyles, improving it, rather than distracting with wires, batteries and LEDs.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

8–8:45 am

Presented by: Ron Houle, President, Pivot Step Consultants

This and the coming years will be a time of great change in defense resourcing and priorities. Come to this session for a comprehensive overview of what we might expect in the next two to five years.

8–9 am

Presented by: Dr. Jan Pegram Ballard, Extension Specialist, ZTE, NCSU, College of Textiles

A number of factors affect the performance of textile goods. A series of three sessions (Fiber Testing, Yarn Testing Part 1 & 2 and Fabric Testing) will provide an overview of important properties of fibers, yarns, fabrics and garments, and how they are measured. Relevant ASTM and AATCC methods will be covered, and you will learn the application of basic test statistics to test reporting and decision making.

Part of the Testing Program

8:30–9:10 am

Presented by: Jeff Rasmussen, Director of Market Research, Industrial Fabrics Association International (IFAI)

This presentation of the smart and interactive fabrics market focuses mostly on the U.S. marketplace. It provides a comprehensive overview into recent smart fabric applications used in a number of government, commercial, medical, and consumer market segments. Market segments include developments in the military and law enforcement safety and protective market, the wearable electronics consumer retail market, the biophysical monitoring market, and more. Nanotechnology and how it is used in various market segments, such as the U.S. military will also be discussed. Future directions for smart fabrics will be presented along with market size and growth rate figures for the global and U.S. smart fabric markets.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

8:45–9:30 am

Presented by: Dr. Jeff Grover, Senior Procurement Analyst, OSD(AT&L), Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy (DPAP)

This session will provide a summary of the DoD procurement organization, system and policies along with an overview of domestic preference procurement requirements in general. Participate in an in-depth discussion regarding the restrictions of the Berry Amendment and its impact on the DoD and industry. Illustrations will compare and contrast the Berry Amendment and the Buy American Act as well as illustrations on the use and limitations of Domestic Non-Availability Determinations (DNADs) by DoD. The session will conclude with an open forum to answer questions.

9 AM
9–9:30 am

Presented by: Dr. Jan Pegram Ballard, Extension Specialist, ZTE, NCSU, College of Textiles

A number of factors affect the performance of textile goods. A series of three sessions (Fiber Testing, Yarn Testing Part 1 & 2 and Fabric Testing) will provide an overview of important properties of fibers, yarns, fabrics and garments, and how they are measured. Relevant ASTM and AATCC methods will be covered, and you will learn the application of basic test statistics to test reporting and decision making.

Part of the Testing Program

9:10–9:30 am

Presented by: Laurie Mease, Trade Specialist, US Department of Commerce/OTEXA

Over the next few years, the smart fabrics industry will continue to make technological advances and expand into new, untapped markets. At the same time, there will be increased interest from consumers as wearable technology firms introduce more appealing products that better fit into our daily lives, as well as from corporations and municipalities interested in taking advantage of smart fabrics’ innovative industrial and infrastructure applications. This presentation will provide an overview of recent research into emerging smart fabrics technologies and feature key sectors where products are being developed and commercialized. In addition, the presentation will highlight U.S. government programs and resources available to companies that wish to bring new smart fabrics technologies to market.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

9:45–10:15 am
9:45–10:30 am

Presented by: David Gray, Founder, MedTextra, Chris Webley, Textile Engineer, MedTextra, Marie O’Mahoney, O’Mahony Consultancy

A camel’s nasal cavity is comprised of an intricate turbinate structure that hydrates air coming toward the animal and dehydrates airflow moving away, allowing a moisture savings of up to 60%. Applying the principles of hygroscopy to everyday textiles, MedTextra LLC has developed textiles using bio-mimicry inspired moisturizing. Water is absorbed from its environment and then used to moisturize the body whilst providing air filtration. This ionic action helps the body’s absorption of active ingredients previously embedded in the fabric, or adds significantly to efficacy of active ingredients applied topically to the wearer.

Imagine analgesic creams, topical ointments and spreads, and antibacterials helping the wearer stay healthy, longer. Whether the textile is used in wearable or medical applications, MedTextra yarns add serious health benefits for health aware consumers.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

9:45–10:30 am

Presented by: Nathaniel Bolin, Counsel, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom

In this presentation, you will learn about the export control laws and policies affecting trade and investment in advanced textiles, including the current state of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and Export Control Reform. You will also learn about the policy changes underway in the national security arena under the administration of President Donald Trump and the impact that those changes will have on opportunities for defense-related and advanced-materials business both here and abroad.

10 AM
10:15–11:15 am

Presented by: Dr. Jan Pegram Ballard, Extension Specialist, ZTE, NCSU, College of Textiles

A number of factors affect the performance of textile goods. A series of three sessions (Fiber Testing, Yarn Testing Part 1 & 2 and Fabric Testing) will provide an overview of important properties of fibers, yarns, fabrics and garments, and how they are measured. Relevant ASTM and AATCC methods will be covered, and you will learn the application of basic test statistics to test reporting and decision making.

Part of the Testing Program

10:30–11:15 am

Presented by: Jeff Dugan, Co-Founder and Vice President, Research, Fiber Innovation Technology

The biological phenomenon known as the “pinecone effect” has been engineered into a bicomponent fiber for the purpose of constructing fabrics that actively become more or less breathable in response to environmental humidity (such as the presence or absence of moisture vapor from perspiration). Just as a pinecone opens and closes to release its seeds in environmental conditions that favor germination, this new fiber assumes a helical curl that reversibly curls more or less tightly with changing humidity. The tighter curl opens pores in the fabric, increasing breathability, and the less-tight curl provides more bulk in the yarn, reducing breathability. The production and processing of this fiber are enabled by FIT’s unmatched precise control of the bicomponent cross section.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

10:30–11:15 am

Presented by: Stephen Luckowski, Program Manager, Revolutionary Fibers and Textiles Manufacturing Innovation Institute, Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC)

This presentation will showcase Advanced Functional Fabrics of America (AFFOA), the 6th manufacturing innovation institute within the Department of Defense which was awarded to AFFOA, a non-profit organization spun out of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The institute’s mission is to enable a manufacturing-based revolution by transforming traditional fibers, yarns and fabrics into sophisticated, integrated and networked devices and systems for both consumer and defense applications. The presentation will also cover AFFOA’s vision and the work being done from a technical, workforce development and prototype manufacturing perspective.

11AM
11:15am–Noon

Presented by: Dr. Martin W. King, Professor of Biotextiles & Textile Technology, NCSU, College of Textiles

The term “medical textiles” covers a wide range of products that protect against infection and disease, that prevent and treat injuries, that maintain hygiene and comfort, that close wounds and surgical incisions and repair or replace injured and diseased tissues. Each application has a particular role to play in promoting the healthcare of the patient, and each type of product, whether a surgical gown, a face mask, a diaper, a wound dressing, a surgical suture, a hernia repair mesh or an endovascular prosthesis, needs to be evaluated for demonstrating functionality, efficacy and safety as well as meeting regulatory requirements. The presentation will review different examples of testing medical textile products and address the controversial issue of why products are sometimes recalled because additional testing is required.

Part of the Testing Program

11:15 am–Noon

Presented by: Dr. Julianna Abel, Professor, University of Minnesota, Mechanical Engineering Department

Mechanical fabrics act as alternative actuators (motors) to produce mechanical work. Because they can do work, mechanical fabrics have the potential to meet emerging needs for diverse engineering applications such as wearable devices, medical and rehabilitation devices, robotic manipulators, and deployable structures. The integration of multifunctional fibers into the fabric structure enables the functionality of mechanical fabrics. In this presentation, Dr. Abel will discuss the impact of fabric manufacturing processes (e.g. knit, weave, stitch) and multifunctional fiber material properties (e.g. shape memory alloys, piezoelectrics, electroactive polymers, photosensitive fibers, and carbon nanotubes) on mechanical performance. She will share details on the design, manufacture, and application of a specific mechanical fabric – shape memory alloy knitted fabrics. Shape memory alloy knitted fabrics produce a variety of complex actuation motions including contraction, scrolling, coiling, arching, and accordioning. She will also highlight recent advances across the field of mechanical fabrics.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

11:15 am–Noon

Presented by: Dr. Charles Bass, Chief, Protection and Hazard Mitigation Branch, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

The Chemical and Biological Technologies Department of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency supports the Warfighter by developing advanced chemical and biological defense technologies that transition into acquisition programs for the Joint Services. Developing advanced technologies that go into Personal Protective Ensembles (PPE) is one of our major commodity areas. We are investing in technologies that improve protection while increasing comfort and mission performance. Our areas of research include: durable repellant, anti-microbial, and self-detoxifying coatings; NFPA 1991/1994 compliant barrier materials with enhanced performance characteristics such as stretch, flexibility, and drape; nanostructured, catalytic adsorbents to replace traditional materials such as active carbon; and integration of nanostructured materials into fibers, yarns, mats and membranes. Our areas of interest include advanced manufacturing techniques that provide affordable integration of advanced dynamic materials into ensembles tailored for the mission.

Part of the Testing Program

NOON
Noon–1:30 pm Keynote Luncheon: Unexpected Paths of Diversification (All)
1 PM
1:30–2 pm

Presented by: Eva Osborne, VP Research and Innovation, Significant Difference

Finished files are the result of years of scientific study combined with the experience of years.” Count the F’s in that sentence. Your answer will depend upon mindset. When we engage in conversations using generalized processing the answer is three Fs. When we analyze discussions with intent, the answer is six Fs. 101 E-Textiles Intro will provide a common language and knowledge for continued conversation during the Smart Fabrics program. The Intro will present baselines on all six Fs: definitions of terms, fields of disciplines, functionality, product formation, and value chains.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

1:30–2:15 pm

Presented by: Diana Wagner, Senior Functional Apparel Designer, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University

The Grip Glove is a soft, textile-based wearable robot that provides assistance to users with weak grip strength due to limited finger and thumb function. The glove leverages soft material actuator technology to safely distribute forces along the length of the fingers and provide active flexion and extension. These actuators consist of sewn fabric structures with polymer based bladders on the inside and produce actuation upon pneumatic pressurization. The glove is designed to fit a range of different unisex hands with a limited number of sizes. Soft and lightweight, the glove interfaces comfortably with a user during activities of daily living.

1:30–2:15 pm

Presented by: Dr. Emiel DenHartog, Associate Professor, Co-Director Textile Protection and Comfort Center, NCSU, College of Textiles, Textile Protection and Comfort Center

The focus of the presentations will be on connecting currently available textile test methods to human comfort and performance. From a human physiology perspective the presentation will address how various test methods for comfort relate to it and what their limitations are. Topics such as thermal comfort, breathability, tactile comfort (‘hand and feel’) and moisture management will be addressed and the relevance of various test methods on these topics will be discussed. The aim is to help industry understand the differences between the wide variety of test methods and avoid unnecessary testing and associated cost and time.

Part of the Testing Program

2 PM
2–3 pm

Presented by: Eva Osborne, VP Research and Innovation, Significant Difference; Connie Huffa, President, Fabdesigns; Gerry Elman, President, Elman Technology Law; Boules Morcos, North America Electroless Nickel Product Manager, MacDermid Enthone; Sandeep Khatua, Independent consultant, Consumer product industry, Babak Movassaghi, VP and GM, Boston Innovation Center, FLEX

Merging electronics into flexible substrates is a topic that is both exciting with its possibilities—and overwhelming with its hurdles. The Smart Fabric Program is presenting a panel of experts who have been asked to roll up their shirt sleeves and answer questions on how to “Do It Yourself.” What do you need to bring that really good idea into production? Who do you need to link with? How do you improve the probability of technical success? The panelists represent multidisciplinary fields within the manufacturing value chain: IP, law, standards, flexible substrates, electronic components and interoperability. The mission is to exchange understanding among the diverse points of view.

The discussion time will be followed up with Q&A from the attendees. Additional time with the experts will be available during the Ask the Experts session in the E-textiles Workshop on the show floor.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

2:15–3 pm

Presented by: Dr. Melissa Knothe Tate, Chair of Biomedical Engineering, University of New South Wales

Our body’s tissues are resilient, elastic and adapt their properties to face the situation at hand. What if our medical devices and implants were made of textiles as smart as our own organs and tissues? TissuTex is paving the way for a new generation of textiles that emulates nature’s brilliant tissues. TissuTex’s recursive weaving technology is at the forefront of textile innovation. The technology harnesses the intrinsic computational power of the Jacquard loom for scale-up and rapid manufacture of smart textiles enabling a generation of medical products whose functionality is woven into the fabric per se. This presentation describes the foundational studies underpinning the development of a new generation of advanced textiles with applications in the medical sector.

2:15–3 pm

Presented by: Diana Wyman, Technical Director, AATCC; Ben Mead, Director, Hohenstein Institute; Scott Exo, USA Country Manager, Better Cotton Initiative; Lee Tyler, Standards and Compliance Manager, Textile Exchange

With growing demand for sustainable products and processes, it’s important to know what certifications are available and how to choose the most appropriate one. How do you know what matters to your customers? What are you allowed to claim? These panelists will help you navigate the options.

Part of the Testing Program

3 PM
3:15–4 pm

Presented by: Dr. Kevin Nelson, Founder and CSO, TissueGen

The medical device industry has undergone significant evolution over the past several years—and drug delivery is moving to the forefront. With the rapid adoption of drug-eluting stents, the medical industry has recognized the value that drug delivery coupled with a medical device can bring to patient care. Enabling the controlled release of pharmaceutical and biological agents within the body directly to the internal sites where they are needed has the potential to revolutionize advanced drug delivery, nerve regeneration and tissue engineering.

However, the types of drugs and biologics able to be successfully loaded to fibers for incorporation into implantable medical devices have traditionally been limited by the manufacturing process itself—typically melt extrusion. Now, the emergence of alternative extrusion methods that occur at room temperature is enabling drug-loading of a wider range of pharmaceutical and biological agents than ever before possible for use in biodegradable implantable devices for localized drug delivery within the body. The incorporation of these drug-loaded fibers into new or existing medical devices can result in faster healing, improved patient compliance, and lower negative outcomes at relatively low cost.

This session will explore the latest advancements in extrusion technology which are enabling the next generation of drug delivery. It will also explore some of the medical applications that stand to be most significantly impacted by this technological advancement.

3:15–4 pm

Presented by: Eva Osborne, VP Research and Innovation, Significant Difference; Connie Huffa, President, Fabdesigns; Gerry Elman, President, Elman Technology Law; Boules Morcos, North America Electroless Nickel Product Manager, MacDermid Enthone; Sandeep Khatua, Independent consultant, Consumer product industry, Babak Movassaghi, VP and GM, Boston Innovation Center, FLEX

Q&A session following the Smart Talk: E-Textiles panel discussion, giving attendees the opportunity to ask questions about commercializing e-textiles. Additional time with the experts will be available during the Ask the Experts session in the E-textiles Workshop on the show floor.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

3:15–4 pm

Presented by: Don Satchell, Director, Situ Biosciences

Durable antimicrobial performance for textiles is provided by the addition of formulation additives. These additives are chemical ingredients that can be incorporated at one of many steps in the textile finishing process. Durable antimicrobial performance is provided by engineering antimicrobial additives into the finished product in a stepwise design process that incorporates an understanding of each textile component, from fiber to finish. Understanding the range of additives, auxiliaries and application processes are key to providing the desired enhanced performance for antimicrobials in textiles.

This discussion will focus on the most common additives, how to appropriately add them to textile formulations, testing for performance and durability, and concerns related to regulatory requirements, product claims and consumer perception. Besides choosing the additives, selecting the appropriate stage in the process for microbial control additives is the first and most important determination of antimicrobial performance. Depending on the type or chemistry of the additive selected, the durability for product performance can be greatly improved for the finished product. Once the application is complete, the product should be tested to validate both the proper applications and performance benefits. Common antimicrobial test methods for antimicrobial performance in textiles include AATCC TM 100, AATCC TM 30 and JIS L 1902. Demonstrating durability can be included by testing against a variety of factors such as ultra violet light (UV), moisture, spoiling and washing. These factors are known to have detrimental effects on antimicrobial properties in textiles. For example, laundering durability testing is an important part of aging a material to determine its antimicrobial efficacy while in use. Additional information on common regulatory requirements, product claims and consumer perception as it relates to antimicrobial textiles are also important when properly formulating a successful and advanced antimicrobial textile.

Part of the Testing Program

4 PM
4–4:45 pm

Presented by: Bentley Mah, Senior Technical Sales for Medical and Healthcare Solutions, Covestro

Recently, textile coating applications in the medical environment have become a new focus of Covestro’s material development. Such applications include surgical wear, hospital bed linen, coatings for medical furniture, but also medical bandages. Covestro AG will be presenting new raw materials for sustainable, water-borne textile coatings with good haptics and enhanced stability towards disinfectants.

4–4:45 pm

Presented by: Dr. Chris Rahn, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Penn State University

Energy is generated in a multitude of ways. Magnetism, chemistry and light are three well understood mechanisms for supplying Power to the People. But what about Power by the People? People move, breath, and maintain a constant body temperature. All three of these modalities offer alternatives sources for energy harvesting. The ASSIST Engineering Research Center is developing devices that harvest energy from human movement and thermal gradients. This presentation describes the energy harvesting opportunities and the potential for embedding power sources into textiles.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

4–4:45 pm

Presented by: Lee Portnoff, Health Scientist, NIOSH/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory

Laboratory personnel, medical professionals, and emergency responders wear protective apparel (e.g., gowns and coveralls) to reduce exposure to harmful chemicals and pathogens. Forces generated by an external pressure are considered a route of liquid penetration through protective fabrics. These pressures arise when individuals lean or press on a surface that may be wet with a toxic substance or bodily fluids. The standard tests for evaluating protective apparel (e.g., AATCC 42, AATCC 127, ASTM F903, ASTM F1670, ASTM F1671, ISO 16603, ISO 16604) began in the 1950s and have not changed significantly in the past two decades. This presentation will explore the past and future of liquid penetration testing.

Part of the Testing Program

4:45–5:30 pm

Presented by: Fitzroy Brown, OEM Technical Sales Manager, Implantable Textiles, Bard Peripheral Vascular OEM Products

The medical textile market is rapidly growing, as medical-grade textiles have proven to provide the versatility and performance that medical device OEMs need to create implantable devices that best meet the needs of today’s medical applications. The incorporation of implantable textiles in vascular medical devices allows for increased flexibility and functionality in product design. Textiles can be developed in 2D and 3D implantable forms, with almost limitless configuration possibilities.

This session will provide a brief history of the evolution of surgical textiles and explore the growing opportunities to use them for vascular surgical applications, such as in heart valves, as pledgets for use as a buttress during suturing procedure, and as cardiovascular patches.
Attendees will develop a better understanding of the structural advantages of incorporating textiles to promote tissue ingrowth and improve blood permeability. They will also get an overview of some of the critical factors a medical device OEM should consider when choosing a textile manufacturer.

4:45–5:30 pm

Presented by: Dr. Jesse Jur, Assistant Professor, TECS, NCSU, College of Textiles

Key to the growth of the e-textile garment marketplace is the ability for the textile and electronics industry to merge in a common language and evaluation of the e-textile system. Standards development are at the heart of this maturation process, leading to a competitive materials marketplace, interoperability across product platforms, and compliance across international borders. The goal of this presentation is to report on the breadth of activity in the United States and International standards communities. In addition, a projection into the future needs of the e-textiles development will be presented in the form of a multi-year standards roadmap.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program and the Testing Program

5 PM
5:30–7 pm
Open to Advanced Textiles exhibitors, Expo Plus attendees, ATP division members and IFAI board members

Presented By: J.M. Rodgers

Wednesday, September 27

8–8:45 am

Presented by: Chris Jorgensen, Director, Technology Transfer, IPC – Association Connecting Electronics Industries; Dr. Benjamin Leever, Advanced Development Team Lead, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory

Military uniforms that provide integrated robotic muscle for lifting and endurance. Fabrics that replace the burdensome weight of electronics soldiers carry into battle. Wearable systems to monitor soldier health and endurance and protect them in war conditions. These are not science fiction; these are just a few of the e-textiles needs of the US military now.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

8–9:30 am

Presented by: Dr. Jesse Jur, Assistant Professor, TECS, NCSU, College of Textiles; Dr. Russell Gorga, Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor, NCSU, College of Textiles

Are you creative? New product or process design relies on not only a keen understanding of the state of the art, but on the ability to consider a broad range of practical and impractical ideas. This interactive session will explore techniques utilized within NC State’s College of Textile’s capstone course for the Textile Engineering and Textile Technology degree programs. Real textile product development examples will be reviewed and the audience will engage in team activities to explore the principles of ideation in the engineering design process.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program and the Testing Program

8:45–9:30 am

Presented by: Alpesh Shah, Sr. Director, Global Business Strategy & Intelligence, IEEE; Dr. Mohan Kumar, Wearable Technologies, Country Head (India); Dr. William Miller, President, MaCT USA, a MILLER WJ & ASSOCIATE Company; Dr. Ming Chang Yang, CEO, Ming Young Biomedical; Mary-Lynn Landgraf, Senior International Trade Specialist, US Department of Commerce/OTEXA

This panel will bring together experts in a variety of technologies e.g. sensors, communications, IoT, cloud, to describe how these can be integrated into textiles for medical applications. Wearables using e-textiles can provide continuous monitoring and capture of data of such items as heart rate, glucose, respiration, throughout daily activities in multiple locales. In addition, wearables may also assist in rehabilitative devices. Standards can enable common metrics, the mass production of such items and thus lower the cost for consumers.

Part of the Smart Fabrics Program

Thursday, September 28

8–9:30 am

Friday, September 29

12:30–1:15 pm Don’t Leave Valuable IP Unprotected – Design Patents in the Wearables Market: IP Wearables, Design Patents, Intellectual Property (All)

 

IFAI Disclaimer: Although every reasonable effort is made to provide the speakers, topics, and sessions listed, some changes or substitutions may occur. Speakers and sessions are subject to cancellation or change up to and including the day the session(s) are scheduled to be held. Changes or cancellations are made at the discretion of IFAI and may be done without notifying attendees. If sessions are changed or cancelled no refunds should be expected. Agreement to attend the IFAI Expo acknowledges acceptance of this provision.